//Target Acquired: How to Define and Use Your Ideal Target Market

Target Acquired: How to Define and Use Your Ideal Target Market

 

 

Quite paradoxically, when it comes to promotion itself, many companies go directly into marketing and forget to think about the most important part of marketing: their target market.

This problem is not limited to new entrepreneurs or new businesses. I've talked to many well established companies that can only describe their target market in broad generalities.

This is a real problem because knowing exactly who you are targeting with your marketing is the key to successfully contacting them, connecting them and convincing them to buy what you are selling. So, even if it's tempting to get started directly in creating your marketing campaigns and creating creative works, it's always useful to ask yourself first about your target market.

In this article, we will see how to identify your target market and use what you know about this market to create targeted marketing campaigns that are selling.

To whom do I address?

Whether you're a new business or a decades-old company that is implementing a new advertising campaign, you should always ask "who do I go to?" . The details are selling and the more you know the market you are targeting, the more effective your marketing will be .

For example, if you sell lotion, you might think that your target market is too important to be defined. I mean, almost everyone is drying their hands at some point, is not it?

While this may be true, there are many different reasons why people buy lotion. Some people live in a dry climate. Some have a skin condition such as rosacea. Some people want a lotion that smells good, while others want a lotion without scent because scented lotions irritate their skin.

Would it be wise to use the same marketing for all these different groups?

Even though your odorless lotion is perfect for people living in a dry climate or it is difficult to market all these markets simultaneously. After all, if someone searches on Google for a "rosacea lotion", he does not look for lotion because he lives in a dry climate . They want a lotion that will treat their specific skin condition.

Even in a more targeted segment of the market such as Rosacea sufferers, it is often possible to further refine your target market. For example, you would want to use very different marketing tactics to market your moms lotion with young children with rosacea than you would if you were trying to sell to middle-aged men with this condition.

Can you understand why understanding your target market is so important? The more clearly and precisely you can answer the question "who am I targeting?", The more targeted and effective your marketing will be. Obviously, you have to balance the size of the market with the specificity of the market but it is essential to understand who you are targeting and what motivates them to create attractive marketing campaigns.

Given all of this, here are some simple questions you can ask yourself to help you define your target market (s):

How do my current clients use my product or service?

As I mentioned above, even people who use your product or service for the same thing can use it for different reasons or in different ways. For example, if you offer billing software, some customers may use it for each customer and each transaction, while others only use it for certain customers or situations.

It is likely that billing software users are probably your most valuable customers and you want to target them more aggressively and with different messaging than you would have occasional users. Your software will be an integral part of your business, so that certain selling points about your software will interest them more than they would for your standard users.

Segmenting your current customer base based on their use of your product or service can give you a clear idea of ​​your target market. It is highly likely that if your current customers love your business for a particular reason, potential customers motivated by the same things will be likely to respond to marketing focused on the same problem.

What am I trying to sell?

This may seem like an obvious part of any marketing campaign, but when it comes to defining your target market, it's important to know what you're trying to sell mostly if you change what you are selling. Many companies are trying to use old marketing tactics to sell a new product and then wonder why their results are bad.

Whether you're trying to market something new or just getting more sales for a particular product or service, it's important to think about your new target market. Different products and services target different audiences, so even small adjustments to what you sell can have a huge impact on how your marketing works.

For example, if you sell cookies and decide to add egg-free organic cookies as a new product, you must market them differently from your standard cookie line.

Let's be honest, most people who buy organic cookies without eggs do not buy them because they are the best cookies. They care more about ingredients than flavor, so your marketing should focus on the health and environment of your cookies.

At the same time, if most of your customers love the flavor of your standard cookies, they are not inclined to buy your organic cookies because they are environmentally friendly. They want the delicious cookies that they know and love. So you need to focus on marketing the flavor of your basic cookie offer in your target market that is less concerned with ingredients.

In the end, what you are trying to sell has a huge impact on how you sell it and who you sell it to. Therefore, "what am I trying to sell?" Should be one of the first things you ask yourself during the marketing process.

What does the competition do?

Although I am a staunch defender of competition, you can learn a lot from the contest – from what will do and from what did not fact. to do .

For example, look at the ad below:

You can clearly see that this business addresses very intense people who probably lead very active and intense lifestyles. To attract this market, their advertising content is very energetic and focused on the flexibility of their offer.

If you are one of their competitors, you can learn a lot. On the one hand, if you want to target the same market, you can search for keywords or phrases that they use to try to attract the attention of their target audience .

Alternatively, if you want to differentiate yourself and try to target an alternative market, you can try focusing on the price, on a different exercise option or on classes less likely to attract customers. less intense potentials.

Whether it's a street gym or an international conglomerate, your competitors can teach you a lot about your target market (or should be) and how to approach them. in your marketing.

Is my target market niche non-existent?

The size of this market is one last thing to remember when you identify your target market. As we discussed earlier, the narrower your target market is, the easier it is to create specific targeted messages for them . However, if you can only target 10 people with this messaging, it may not be a market that deserves to be targeted.

Given the massive reach of online advertising platforms such as Facebook and Google, this is not a common problem, but it must be taken into account when defining your target market or markets. If you are struggling to effectively target the market you have selected, you may need to take a step back and expand your audience a bit.

As a rule, I'd like to assume that 3% of the people you can target with a given marketing channel are ready to buy today and 3% can probably be convinced to buy . If these 3 to 6% of your target market is not enough to value your time and money, your market is probably too niche to be useful.

Conclusion

While it's easy to assume that you know your target market and what they want, take the time to think carefully about what you sell, who you sell it to and sell it to better. improve your marketing results. It may not be the most glamorous or exciting part of marketing, but it's a key part of any good marketing campaign.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the invited author and not necessarily Marketing Land. The authors of the staff are listed here .

About the author

Jacob is a passionate entrepreneur with the mission of developing businesses using PPC & CRO. As Founder and CEO of Disruptive Advertising Jacob has developed an award-winning, world-class organization that has helped more than 2,000 businesses increase their online revenues. Connect with him on Twitter .