//Opinion: The Google Partner Program Incentives Should Include Actual Customer Objectives
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Opinion: The Google Partner Program Incentives Should Include Actual Customer Objectives

 

 

I received an email yesterday about new challenges and benefits related to the partners' experience Google. So I went there to see how things were going.

Have you visited the Google Partners Rewards Experience ? This simplifies the steps to get how points are earned by the agencies and shows you exactly what you can do to get those points (and what these points are buying you.) Google Brand Tile, Anyone?

According to the page, you can earn points with these seven "challenges":

Audience challenge: search automation, display automation, last click on adoption, organization of a live event, participate in training, certifications and specializations wAAACwAAAAAAQABAEACAkQBADs= - Opinion: The Google Partner Program Incentives Should Include Actual Customer Objectivesopinion the google partner program incentives should include actual customer objectives - Opinion: The Google Partner Program Incentives Should Include Actual Customer Objectives

. Give agencies a way to earn points for fun to win loot, but some of these categories have a more disturbing tone.

For example, urge an agency to add GDN search or automation in a percentage of accounts so that they can get Google's ping-pong table does not begin to reach the actual objectives of the customers. This is not to say if this automation is, at the moment, even what this account needs.

The fact that Google does not encourage agencies to choose what is best for their accounts receivable is unfortunately regrettable. It does not surprise me anymore, but it reminds me of the conversations I have had with many PPCers (including Googlers) over the years. Conversations that often involve the desire of the agency and Google's representative program are refocused on what best suits the goals of individual accounts, rather than on what will achieve Google's internal goals. .

Admittedly, Google is a business and therefore has its own incentives to strike (although many discussions have been held in recent years on the line of demarcation that opposes them, especially in light of decisions from the EU and other concerns, an argument I will not even try to defend.

That said, I do not mind saying that the incentives offered to agencies that s & # 39; Whether or not they align with an individual customer account is a major concern for me, both for my clients, for my own business, and for the industry itself.

In the end, I think what is in the best interest of Google, my agency and the client (you remember, those who finance * all * this interest) are all equal – success of the client account.

Customers measure their success ifferently, which complicates the situation. But we are in 2019, and we have data coming out of our ears and more likely, we have specific targets for many accounts we manage. Not an agency? Guess what; internal teams also have goals.

What if we all worked together on what our customers really wanted to accomplish?

wAAACwAAAAAAQABAEACAkQBADs= - Opinion: The Google Partner Program Incentives Should Include Actual Customer Objectives Now is the time for

Of course, if we had a mechanism to accurately measure the quality of an agency, we then had to solve the problem of all these less than stellar digital solutions.

To tell the truth, I am not so concerned about this problem.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the invited author and not necessarily those of Marketing. Earth. Associated authors are listed here .

About the Author

opinion the google partner program incentives should include actual customer objectives - Opinion: The Google Partner Program Incentives Should Include Actual Customer Objectives

Kirk is the owner of ZATO, his his micro-agency PPC of experts, and works in the digital. Marketing since 2009. He has been ranked among the 25 most influential PPCs in the world by PPC Hero for 3 consecutive years and has written articles for many industry publications. He is one of the hosts of the weekly #PPCChat on Twitter, as well as an enthusiastic speaker of the conference, who traveled the United States and the United Kingdom to talk about paid search (especially Shopping Ads) . Kirk currently resides in Billings, Montana with his wife, five children and little sleep.