//Does the SEO table stakes? (Hint: no!)

Does the SEO table stakes? (Hint: no!)

 

 

At the end of 2006, the topic of the day was: "Is SEO a Rocket Science?" Of course, you were only talking about boosting your organic traffic to a trajectory somehow. one by throwing the mathematical equation for the PageRank.

As a fledgling industry, it seemed at the time that search engine optimization (SEO) was a dark art, or at least something that laymen could not understand easily.

Flash 12, and the dominant sentiment among many SEOs has changed dramatically. Now, I hear not only that they think SEO is not rocket science, but that it has moved to the other extreme and that it has become a table issue, a basic practice that just the world connected to digital marketing should know.

In some companies, SEO has become so widespread that senior management believes that it is no longer necessary to appeal to a particular expertise and eliminates dedicated SEO teams reducing content editorial and .

I saw some of this dismissive attitude. In 2015, a former employer eliminated the SEO team and traffic dropped by almost 30% soon after. The reason given for the elimination? SEO is a table issue.

Why the idea that SEO is no longer a specialized practice and is it turned into table issues?

SEO wears gray hair

SEO has existed since the mid-1990s and has evolved. Once considered a cottage industry, SEO companies have grown and, collectively, the industry has become a powerful entity with solo practitioners and publicly traded companies working side by side.

SEO as a discipline has been integrated with traditional marketing strategies, with most medium and large companies having an internal SEO expert or agencies to manage their work. SEO has become a common marketing strategy and an ubiquitous part of the business.

Not fast enough

Search engine optimization is not the only channel that generates traffic, and it is not the only factor that you need to pay attention to, there is still a lot of traffic. others like paid search, social networks, email and affiliate marketing. What all four have in common is that SEO is not the speed of the result.

SEO lacks immediate results, a change you make today may not show all results for several months, or until Google performs the next update. While paid search efforts, social marketing or email marketing, the results can be seen and the return on investment determined fairly quickly. This slow response decreases the attractiveness of SEO.

 SEO Professionals "width =" 800 "height =" 450 "/><h2> Basic Knowledge</h2><p> Any internal SEO worthy of the name has set up a training program within his company to make sure that everyone is trained in SEO in order to be able to do his job effectively.</p><p> This means that the development team will know the technical referencing in order to be able to implement technical recommendations, that the content teams will be trained on the SEO and that other teams will know enough to determine when to contact the SEO. team for advice.</p><p> Because of this, you have people who "do SEO" but are not explicitly SEOs. Under the 80/20 rule, these people will be able to perform 80% of SEO, content, search by keywords, meta tags and internal link work. It's great until something goes wrong and you need someone who can do the hardest 20 percent.</p><p> Many companies that eliminate multiple SEO positions do not understand the need for someone capable of "doing the tricky part" because the 80% are working properly.</p><p> Another problem is Google. <a href= Google constantly modifies its algorithm Many are minor and go unnoticed, but there are others that have an impact on many. Some are specific to certain industries, others to types of research, others address issues of relevance and quality. Even with an internal team, recovery from major Google updates can be difficult because any changes made will only be visible once the Google updates. But without a dedicated SEO in the team, there is a good chance that the company will wait even longer, because asking for help from an external agency to "fix" things demanded more time.

With a dedicated staff dedicated to SEO, it is very likely that Google's updates will not affect a site as it is maintained and updated on current practices.

Experience and Connections

A dedicated internal SEO should know modern best practices, have an idea of ​​the future direction of research and be aware of algorithmic changes as they occur. They should have good relationships within the industry and with their peers to whom they can go for mutual help and brainstorming. The problem is that as the sector grows and matures, your peer network begins to shrink as people retire, are promoted, or change careers. This decrease in core specialists has an impact on the growth of the industry, as new practitioners do not have the benefit of experience and turn to "fast" tactics such as paid search and social networks to get results.

The phrase "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing" applies absolutely to SEO, especially to new practitioners. It's easy to get into fast, simple and inexpensive tactics, but if they go against Google's terms of service and the site, the use of experts and tools to solve the problem is not easy. is not limited to SEO.

Pay me now or pay me later.

So I ask you, do you still think that SEO is a table issue? If you have read this so far, it is obvious that the opinion of this author is, but reiterates:

SEO remains an important traffic factor.
SEO can atrophy if you do not know.
Everyone should know about SEO, but you need someone who is experienced and dedicated to lead it.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the invited author and not necessarily the search engine. The authors of the staff are listed here .

About the author

Simon Heseltine is Vice President of Audience Growth at Interactive Trader a leading provider of digital offerings including CycleTrader, RVTrader, Recreational Vehicle Web Services, Commercial Web Services, CommercialTruckTrader and EquipmentTrader.com. He was one of the first columnists on Search Engine Land in 2007 to write on internal teams and has won numerous industry awards for his expertise in their management.